Resonate Acoustics will advise TEMLAB, based in Suzhou in eastern Jiangsu province, on the design of new specialist transmission electron microscopes (TEM) laboratories.

“The alliance marks a significant expansion of our business, which relies on the export market for sustained growth,” Resonate Acoustics’ managing director Matthew Stead said.

He said a number of valuable lessons were learnt through the negotiation process, something that would assist in forming future alliances.

“Be thorough, do your homework upfront and be across the myriad tax, legal and accounting issues associated with setting up a joint venture in China as they ultimately define the arrangement reached,” he said.

“Culturally, the Chinese business person tends to be more bullish and less risk averse than we might be and probably sees us as a little regimented and conservative, wanting everything crossed and dotted before we move to the next stage.”

Where a normal microscope uses light to produce an image, TEM microscopes use electronics to produce images, allowing for much greater magnification — including the outline of an atom.

Resonate will work closely with its partner across the manufacturing process, advising on the best locations for laboratory sites, as well as assisting with the design and fitout of facilities.

Quality assurance inspections will also be conducted regularly.

“With China rapidly moving towards advanced manufacturing, it’s an enormous opportunity to tap into this vast market,” Mr Stead said.

TEMLAB director Binbin Gu said an Australian-based Chinese academic in noise vibration and electromagnetic fields advised pointed the organisation in the direction of Resonate.

Founded five years ago, Resonate has grown from a sole employee to 26 staffacross Australia and Dublin, Ireland.

It advised the SA Government on noise and vibration modelling, mitigation and management on the Torrens to Torrens project and, more recently, the Darlington upgrade project.