How to Form a China WFOE: Revealing Investor Ownership is NOT Optional, Part 2

China WFOE Formation
China WFOE Formation. It’s complicated.

Yesterday, in the first part of this two-part series, I discussed how China is requiring foreign companies reveal all layers of WFOE ownership in the WFOE formation stage, I talked about how just as so many foreign companies are realizing the importance/necessity of forming a China WFOE, China has made it nearly impossible to form a WFOE without a full list of its owners. I first wrote about this issue in China’s New Foreign Investment Law: The “Actually Controlling Person” Requirement is Going to be Tough, but it is now at the point where the China lawyers at my firm are very clear with our clients who seek to retain us to help them form a China WFOE: you either reveal pretty much all owners of the WFOE-to-be (through the various layers of ownership) or your chances of getting a WFOE are not good. Clients unwilling or unable to make the required ownership disclosure in the exact form required by the PRC government authorities cannot proceed. There are no exceptions to the rule.

As noted in my earlier post, this is a threshold issue and this issue must be resolved before it makes sense to incur the time and expense required for aWFOE formation application.

China’s intent with this new [ownership disclosure] system is clear. The PRC government will no longer allow the use of special purpose vehicles and related entity structures to hide the actual ownership of the investors in PRC foreign-invested enterprises. And any attempt by a foreign investor to invoke a foreign law that allows secrecy with respect to ownership will [almost surely] be ignored. MOFCOM has plans to carefully audit all FIEs and that audit will include carefully reviewing their ownership structures. More important, however, is that a response that does not list out owners will simply not be accepted by the automated system. A response is therefore forced. A false response is a violation of law that can result in penalties and other legal/administrative action by the PRC government and its agencies.

Consider a typical private equity fund/venture capital type of ownership structure. The investor in the WFOE is Operating Company A. The owner of Operating Company A is a Holding Company B. Holding Company B is in turn owned by three private equity funds: Equity Funds C, D and E. The largest of the funds is owned by Equity Fund Z. As you can see, there are four layers of ownership.
For the MOFCOM information report, it is certain we will be required to disclose the following:
  • Operating Company A as the investor. This will require disclosing the officers and directors of Operating Company A.
  • Holding Company B is a 100% shareholder of Operating Company A. This will require we disclose Holding Company B, together with its officers and directors. We usually argue that Holding Company B is a “private equity fund”, and for that reason, we should not be required to disclose the shareholders of Holding Company B. Some MOFCOM offices will accept this argument. Some will not. Even if the local MOFCOM accepts, the higher level MOFCOM that does the later audit may not accept and then require all shareholders of Holding Company B be disclosed.
  • The local MOFCOM office may require disclosing the three shareholders of Holding Company B. If MOFCOM makes this demand, it will also require disclosing the directors and officers of Holding Company B. For the past several months, most MOFCOM offices have required this level of disclosure and foreign investors should plan on this disclosure being required.

The big question is whether MOFCOM will require moving up the chain to mandate disclosing the shareholders of the three shareholders in Holding Company B (Equity Funds C, D and E).  We have in the last few months been asked by various MOFCOMs for this level of disclosure, but we have so far been able to convince them that this should not be necessary. In one instance, we provided MOFCOM with an organization chart showing nearly 75 owners of an LLC (including many private equity funds) but ended up convincing it not to require our client disclose the names of these nearly 75 owners, as originally requested. When MOFCOM requests/requires this sort of disclosure, we normally argue that the C, D and E entities are “private equity funds” and disclosure of their ownership should not be required for the same reasons public company investors are not required to disclose their shareholders. Several local MOFCOM offices have recently tentatively accepted this argument, but this decision is not binding and the higher level of MOFCOM could demand more disclosure, either as part of the initial WFOE formation process or later as a result of their audit.

China has rejected shareholder secrecy and its requirement of full shareholder disclosure imposed on foreign investors is simply the consistent application of PRC law to all legal persons. The shareholder disclosure requirement is contrary to European and North American legal principles and on that basis many shareholders will refuse to consent to disclosure. However, under PRC law, there is no exemption. Moreover, as noted in Part One of this series, PRC local governments and MOFCOM offices are authorized to require even more sensitive private documents, such as the shareholders’ tax returns and tax returns of the WFOE’s foreign employees.
Bottom Line: If you are unwilling or even legally unable to comply with China’s ownership disclosure requirements you cannot proceed with a China WFOE formation. It is that simple and resistance is futile.
This article was written by Steve Dickinson and published on China Law Blog. Original Post:      

View the original article here.

Steve Dickinson

Steve focuses on assisting foreign companies who do business in and with China. He prides himself on working primarily in the “real” China: the world of the factories, fish plants, and farms that lie outside of Beijing and Shanghai. Work in these areas requires a command of the Chinese language and an appreciation for the history and culture of China, and Steve possesses both of those in spades.