Do Your China Products Come From North Korea? What Will the Jury Say?

China attorneys One of our China lawyers got a weird call a few weeks from a somewhat distraught clothing manufacturer who had just learned that products his company was having made in China may in fact have been made in North Korea. This person wanted to know whether if that were the case whether he might go to jail. When we told him we didn’t know whether it would be illegal or not and that much would likely depend on how much his company knew about the North Korea connection and when, he very quickly lost his ardor for hiring us.

I thought of that call today while reading an article entitled, North Korea factories humming with ‘Made in China’ clothes, traders say. The article essentially says that some clothes that bear a “Made in China” label are actually being made in North Korea. And some are being made in China by North Korean “guest” workers. The degree of culpability for this sort of thing usually ranges roughly along the following spectrum:

  • Those who know and approve of their products being made in North Korea yet labelled “Made in China.” These companies no doubt like the cost savings.
  • Those who don’t want to know where their products are made and make zero effort to prohibit their products being made in North Korea and make zero effort to monitor where their products are being made.. These companies no doubt also like the cost savings and courts tend to categorize them as “having known or should have known.”
  • Those who are actually making a reasonable effort to make sure the products they are sourcing from China are not being made in North Korea.

Now without even discussing whether having your products made in North Korea, funding (albeit indirectly North Korea), and receiving products made in North Korea is legal or not — and this will vary by country — how do you want to be viewed if you are ever before a judge or a jury in your home country? Do you want to be seen as the person/company that tried to stop your products from being made in North Korea, the company that affirmatively didn’t care or the company that encouraged? Now before you answer that, ask any lawyer (no matter what the law is) which category of client he or she would rather defend. The answer to that is obvious. When facing a judge or a jury, the company/person that looks the best is the one most likely to prevail.

Just imagine if opposing counsel gets into evidence some of the things from this article, including how “In North Korea, factory workers can’t just go to the toilet whenever they feel like, otherwise they think it slows down the whole assembly line.” Or that the workers get to keep only ⅓ of their wages, which are only half those in China to begin with, and yet work from 7:30 a.m. until 10 p.m., or 14.5 hours. If facing a jury with those facts doesn’t scare you, I do not know what will.

So when it comes to North Korea how can you be good to look good? It’s like just about everything else with China and with manufacturing: you put how you want your Chinese counter-party to act in your contract (and if you want that contract to actually work, you do these things as well) and you monitor as best you can whether your Chinese counter-party is actually abiding by the terms in your contract.

Simple yet not so simple. But really important.

Your thoughts?

 

Dan Harris

Dan Harris is internationally regarded as a leading authority on legal matters related to doing business in China and in other emerging economies in Asia. Forbes Magazine, Business Week, Fortune Magazine, BBC News, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Economist, CNBC, The New York Times, and many other major media players, have looked to him for his perspective on international law issues.